Videos from back then

Udorn and North Viet Nam

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Passin' Gas

shot in 1970McDonnell Phantom IIs refueling over Laos after takeoff from Udorn, Thailand. For straight F4s, the weight of ordinance (generally bombs) displaced fuel (about 6.5 pounds per gallon) to keep takeoff weight within design limits of about 58,000 pounds. Reduced fuel load and ordinance induced drag meant strike aircraft typically hit the tanker going in and coming out from strikes. (Photographed by Taylor Eubank)


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Flying United

Pilot’s-eye view from the cockpit of an RF-4C during aerial refueling; photographed live and in progress; a necessary prelude to a combat reconnaissance mission (call sign Bullwhip) over the Plaine de Jars, Ban Ban and Sam Nuea routes 7 and 6 in northern Laos; the gas station is a Boeing KC-135 (civilian: 707); as depicted, only a few feet separate the two aircraft. (Photographed by Taylor Eubank)


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Cry Havoc!

The American-built airfield, Long Tien (spellings vary), between Vietiane and the Plaine de Jars; home of General Vang Pao, a Hmong chief and CIA operative, eventually relocated to the U.S.; also scenes of the PDJ —the scars are bomb hits; the river forms the letter M, an oft-used visual landmark; in 1970 an 11TRS crew was shot down (and rescued) in the vicinity of the M. (Photographed by Taylor Eubank)


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Battle Damage

After refueling (Flying United, supra), the reconnaissance mission was terminated when the Phantom II sustained 37-57 mm anti-aircraft hits over highway 6 east of Sam Nuea; depicted is the outcome when bullets hit the nozzles at the rear of a GE J-79 engine. (Photographed by Taylor Eubank)